Fairphone 2, the successor of Fairphone based on the same theme of modular architecture has carried the reputation of Fairphone very well. Amsterdam based smartphone maker has launched Fairphone 2 at London Design Festival.

It is the first modular smartphone of its kind which gives freedom to its owner to open it up and restore; it doesn’t involve any screws, wiring. All you have to do is just pop the old part out and clip the new one in and your smartphone is all good to go. All of the replacement parts of the Fairphone 2 will be available directly from Fairphone.

 

 

Fairphone has teamed up with London design firm Seymourpowell to develop Fairphone 2 whose modular design has potential to be a game changer in phone manufacturing and its architecture will improve the longevity of the smartphones. The phone boasts a 5-inch full HD display with 2GB RAM and 32GB of expandable internal memory via microSD, support for LTE-Advanced and dual SIM slots. It will be running on Android 5.1 Lollipop and  a 2.4 GHz Snapdragon 801 processor with a battery of 2,420 mAh.

 

Credits : Hi-tecnoblog.it

Credits : Hi-tecnoblog.it

 

Phone features a rear camera of 8 megapixel and none in front, which seems to be the only major flaw in the design of Fairphone 2. Company also said that the smartphone will be running on open-source operating systems such as Jolla’s Sailfish OS which doesn’t seem to be the case for now being. It is 11 millimeters thick and that is way too bulky as compared to flagship phones of its adversaries but its design is still a trump card that might help it to steal the show.

 

“You can’t make phones that don’t break, but you can make a phone that’s repairable.”

– Fairphone founder and CEO Bas van Abel

 

Fairphone aims at reducing e-waste and that is a better approach than filling the lands with e-products. Netherlands based company has always committed to build an ethical smartphone; it gets all 0f its minerals and metals from “conflict-free” mines and creating a better workplace for workers to grow with the company.

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